People

Jens Koed MAdsen, london school of economics (UK)

Jens is an assistant professor in psychology at the London School of Economics and Political Science (UK). He works on how people are persuaded to change their beliefs as well as how individual, social, and systemic factors interact with each other to shape individual and collective beliefs and behaviours. Jens also tests how interventions such as policy change, information campaigns, and economic incentives impact complex human-environment systems. He works with different methodological approaches including qualitative interviews, experimental cognitive psychology as well as Bayesian and agent-based modelling. Amongst other topics, he has published on micro-targeting, discriminatory reasoning, and echo chamber formation. Email: j.madsen2@lse.ac.uk


Key publications:

mAX rOLLWAGE, sYMUDYNE (UK)

Max is a research scientist at the tech startup Symudyne and has previously worked as researcher at University College London. His research focusses on how people change their (political) views based on new information, how (mis-) information spreads on social media and how these processes contribute to radical and polarized political beliefs. To address these questions he uses a range of methods, including behavioral modeling, neuroimaging, agent-based modeling and larger real-world data sets from social media. Email: max.rollwage.16@alumni.ucl.ac.uk


Key publications:

Sung-youn Kim, konkuk university (south korea)

Yoshihisa (yoshi) kashima, university of melbourne (Australia)

Yoshihisa Kashima is Professor of Psychology at the University of Melbourne. His interest in the role of ideologies in public opinion dynamics stems from his broader interest on cultural dynamics – the formation, maintenance, and transformation of culture over time, with particular emphasis on culture of sustainability. He has written more than 200 academic articles, including those published in journals such as Science, Nature Climate Change, Psychological Review, Psychological Bulletin, American Psychologist, and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. He was Associate Editor of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and the President of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology. Email: ykashima@unimelb.edu.au


Key publications:

Sven Banisch, Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences (GErmany)

Sven is a postdoctoral associate at the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences. He uses mathematical and computational tools to better understand the socio-cognitive processes involved in collective opinion formation. Sven pursues fundamental research on the role that basic mechanisms of social reward and information processing play in massive computer mediated interaction on opinions. Email: sven.banisch@universecity.de


Key publications:


Nicola catancci, University of Hertfordshire (UK)

Nicola holds the Vice-chancellor Research Fellowship on “Information Theory for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics” at the University of Hertfordshire (United Kingdom). His research is focused on understanding how information is processed by agents with bounded rationality and how such information processing impacts the representations agents have about others and themselves. Currently, he is working on a framework of decision-making with partial observability to model how political agents can acquire beliefs about the society and how these can be artificially shaped by propaganda. Email: n.catenacci-volpi@herts.ac.uk


Key publications:


Dimitri ognibene, university of milano-bicocca (italy)

Dimitri is Associate Professor in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence at the University of Milano Bicocca. His research interests span from Robotics and Machine Learning to Computational Neuroscience. Dimitri's work focuses on creating adaptive artificial systems with exploratory skills and active perception capabilities flexible enough to tackle complex social environments (physical or virtual). I also study how these skills are realized in living organisms together with the causes and consequences of their failures.. Email:

dimitri.ognibene@unimib.it


Key publications:


Lee de-wit, university of cambridge (UK)

Lee is a lecturer in political psychology at the University of Cambridge. His research focuses on experimental and computational approaches to studying the political psychology of voters, with a particular focus on immigration and polarization. This includes computational models of polarization, data driven approaches to voter clustering, geographical psychological studies of values that strongly correlate with voting behaviour, and message framing experiments. Lee is particularly interested in how political decision making might be influenced by the choice architecture of different political systems and the role of different cultural norms in different countries. Lee originally started as a researcher in visual neuropsychology, and so is interested in broader theoretical questions about the challenges of employing experimental and computational approaches to our subjective life. Email: lhd26@cam.ac.uk


Key publications:


Mark brandt, michigan state university (Usa)

Mark Brandt is an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University (USA). His research goal is to understand ideological and moral beliefs – such as political ideology, racism, religious fundamentalism, and moral conviction – and how they structure attitudes and behaviors, how they provide people with meaning, and why people adopt them in the first place. Email: brandt15@msu.edu


Key publications:


Flavio azevedo, university of cambridge (Uk)

Flavio Azevedo is a political psychologist, Fulbright fellow, and postdoc at the Social Decision-Making Lab at Cambridge University. His research focuses on ideology, how to measure it, and its role in political behavior and in justifying social and economic injustices. At Cambridge, Flavio focuses on uncovering the ideological basis of anti-scientific attitudes and conspiratorial thinking. Flavio co-founded and directs FORRT—A Framework for Open and Reproducible Research Training—an award-winning interdisciplinary community of 350+ early-career scholars aiming to integrate open scholarship principles into higher education and to advance research transparency. Twitter: @Flavio_Azevedo. Email: fa441@cam.ac.uk


Key publications: